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Tribute to the moon:
the L.U.C Lunar One

Chopard L.U.C. Lunar One

L.U.C Lunar One

The L.U.C. Lunar One doesn’t only infallibly and precisely display time. The moon-phase display is the dial’s eye-catching element – round as its counterpart on the firmament.
  • Material: 950/- platinum with a blue alligator skin strap
  • Movement: Self-winding movement, Caliber L.U.C 96.13-L
  • Diameter: 40 mm
  • Special features: Perpetual calendar with an orbital moon-phase display, limited to 100 watches
  • Wempe reference: CH030081
Chopard clockwork

Captivating as a glance at the night sky

 

Chopard’s 43 mm L.U.C Lunar One is anything but forgetful. In fact, it’s just the oppo- site: two future-oriented “memories” are integrated into each of the 100 platinum watches of this limited edition. One “memory” is for the elaborate, meticulously crafted calendar, which is unfortunately concealed beneath the dial. This mechanism’s indicators, on the other hand, are in full view: the date occupies two windows below the 12 o’clock position, while the day of the week and the month are shown by two long hands at the 9 and 3 o’clock positions. Their shorter, concentrically rotating counterparts help the watch’s owner to correctly set this complex companion for the wrist. The short hand at the left shows whether daytime or nighttime hours are dis- played: after all, a calendar’s indicators should advance at midnight, not at noon. The hand at the right shows the current position of the leap-year cycle. The foregoing explanations should make it clear that this timepiece hosts a perpetual calendar. If the two mainsprings are wound regularly, the calendar will need no manual resetting until the end of the second month in 2100, when the leap day will be eliminated in accord with the rules stipulated by Pope Gregory XIII’s calendar reform. After a small manual correction, the L.U.C. Lunar One and its calendar will again be ready for the next 100 years. Automatic Caliber L.U.C 96.13-L wound by micro rotor, which is a mere six millimeters in height, also offers another horological tidbit: a unique orbital moon-phase display at the 6 o’clock position. Two discs, each with 135 teeth, rotate coaxially one atop the other. The lower disc depicts two diametrically positioned moons. Above it, a pierced disc bearing a representation of the starry firmament rotates in the same direction as its counterpart, but at twice its speed. An intelligent gear train ensures that the new moon always appears at the dial’s center and the full moon is always shown at the 6 o’clock position. This display runs with marvelous accuracy: it deviates from astronomical reality by a mere 57.2 seconds per lunation (29.53059 days), which is the interval between two successive new moons.

The Art of Horological Complications
The Art of Horological Complications

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